stuff. things.

Mar 18
Permalink
grey2scale:

day two of the 30 day challenge
quick gif of my good buddy sean
twistedwillowblog

grey2scale:

day two of the 30 day challenge

quick gif of my good buddy sean

twistedwillowblog

Feb 16
Permalink

peaceshine3:

justloveaj:

pompous-panda:

cloud-answers:

averagedopeydope:

cookierobotgaming:

zombimanos:

iraffiruse:

Twisted Speedo

I tried not to reblog this. I REALLY did.

You have to believe me, I tried…

CookieMonster2014

I support him

he has my vote.

this is gold. 

The pictures do thec talking

ok this shit was hilarious

(via mostlysignssomeportents)

Nov 08
Permalink

After learning my flight was detained 4 hours,
I heard the announcement:
If anyone in the vicinity of gate 4-A understands any Arabic,
Please come to the gate immediately.

Well—one pauses these days. Gate 4-A was my own gate. I went there.
An older woman in full traditional Palestinian dress,
Just like my grandma wore, was crumpled to the floor, wailing loudly.
Help, said the flight service person. Talk to her. What is her
Problem? we told her the flight was going to be four hours late and she
Did this.

I put my arm around her and spoke to her haltingly.
Shu dow-a, shu- biduck habibti, stani stani schway, min fadlick,
Sho bit se-wee?

The minute she heard any words she knew—however poorly used—
She stopped crying.

She thought our flight had been canceled entirely.
She needed to be in El Paso for some major medical treatment the
Following day. I said no, no, we’re fine, you’ll get there, just late,

Who is picking you up? Let’s call him and tell him.
We called her son and I spoke with him in English.
I told him I would stay with his mother till we got on the plane and
Would ride next to her—Southwest.

She talked to him. Then we called her other sons just for the fun of it.

Then we called my dad and he and she spoke for a while in Arabic and
Found out of course they had ten shared friends.

Then I thought just for the heck of it why not call some Palestinian
Poets I know and let them chat with her. This all took up about 2 hours.

She was laughing a lot by then. Telling about her life. Answering
Questions.

She had pulled a sack of homemade mamool cookies—little powdered
Sugar crumbly mounds stuffed with dates and nuts—out of her bag—
And was offering them to all the women at the gate.

To my amazement, not a single woman declined one. It was like a
Sacrament. The traveler from Argentina, the traveler from California,
The lovely woman from Laredo—we were all covered with the same
Powdered sugar. And smiling. There are no better cookies.

And then the airline broke out the free beverages from huge coolers—
Non-alcoholic—and the two little girls for our flight, one African
American, one Mexican American—ran around serving us all apple juice
And lemonade and they were covered with powdered sugar too.

And I noticed my new best friend—by now we were holding hands—
Had a potted plant poking out of her bag, some medicinal thing,

With green furry leaves. Such an old country traveling tradition. Always
Carry a plant. Always stay rooted to somewhere.

And I looked around that gate of late and weary ones and thought,
This is the world I want to live in. The shared world.

Not a single person in this gate—once the crying of confusion stopped
—has seemed apprehensive about any other person.

They took the cookies. I wanted to hug all those other women too.
This can still happen anywhere.

Not everything is lost.

Naomi Shihab Nye (b. 1952), “Wandering Around an Albuquerque Airport Terminal.” I think this poem may be making the rounds, this week, but that’s as it should be.  (via oliviacirce)

When I lose hope in the world, I remember this poem.

(via bookoisseur)

(via mostlysignssomeportents)

Oct 05
Permalink
jtotheizzoe:

On June 28, 2009, Stephen Hawking hosted a party for future time travelers  He didn’t tell anyone about his plans until after it was over.
Sadly, no one showed up:

Sigh.
Physics suggests that backwards time travel just isn’t possible, although one theory says we could sufficiently warp time and space to moonwalk into yesterday if we could harness half of the universe’s matter and energy. So, yeah, not holding my breath there (plus you always have to watch out for those pesky Libyans).
Einstein’s relativity does allow for forward time travel, though. That’s thanks to time dilation. In certain circumstances, observers in different frames of reference will experience time differently for one another. Travel very near the speed of light and you’d return home to find everyone you know dead of old age, which would suck because you’d have no one to tell your stories to.
Time dilation is more than a thought experiment. Thanks to gravitational differences, astronauts onboard the ISS age 9 milliseconds less than we do for every year they are up there!
Russian cosmonaut Sergei Avdayev holds the time travel record, being about 20 milliseconds behind all of us after spending 747 days aboard Mir. GPS satellites experience this kind of time dilation, and have to be constantly corrected to stay in sync with Earth.
Of course, if you want to split hairs, we’re all time traveling. Forward, at one second per second … but it’s not as exciting if everyone else is doing it, eh?
Limited-edition print above by Peter Dean, available here.

Stephen Hawking had a party of time travelers, which he only publicized after it had occurred — and no-one showed up. Pity.

jtotheizzoe:

On June 28, 2009, Stephen Hawking hosted a party for future time travelers  He didn’t tell anyone about his plans until after it was over.

Sadly, no one showed up:


Sigh.

Physics suggests that backwards time travel just isn’t possible, although one theory says we could sufficiently warp time and space to moonwalk into yesterday if we could harness half of the universe’s matter and energy. So, yeah, not holding my breath there (plus you always have to watch out for those pesky Libyans).

Einstein’s relativity does allow for forward time travel, though. That’s thanks to time dilation. In certain circumstances, observers in different frames of reference will experience time differently for one another. Travel very near the speed of light and you’d return home to find everyone you know dead of old age, which would suck because you’d have no one to tell your stories to.

Time dilation is more than a thought experiment. Thanks to gravitational differences, astronauts onboard the ISS age 9 milliseconds less than we do for every year they are up there!

Russian cosmonaut Sergei Avdayev holds the time travel record, being about 20 milliseconds behind all of us after spending 747 days aboard Mir. GPS satellites experience this kind of time dilation, and have to be constantly corrected to stay in sync with Earth.

Of course, if you want to split hairs, we’re all time traveling. Forward, at one second per second … but it’s not as exciting if everyone else is doing it, eh?

Limited-edition print above by Peter Dean, available here.

Stephen Hawking had a party of time travelers, which he only publicized after it had occurred — and no-one showed up. Pity.

(via we-are-star-stuff)

Oct 02
Permalink
jtotheizzoe:

The CDC has released a first-of-its-kind report detailing the threat of antibiotic-resistant bacteria to our health and food supply. It is not pretty.
Within the report (you can read it here, it’s very layman-accessible) lies threat assessments for a whole range of disease-causing microbes, from famous foes like methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) to lesser-known dangers like Clostridium dificile and drug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae (yes, that last one does exactly what you think it does).
Thousands of people are killed by such infections every year. They inflict billions of dollars of medical costs and lost wages. The drug-development pipeline for new antibiotics is almost empty. New tools like fecal transplants and phage therapy are hopeful but still experimental, and at least a decade away. So what do we do?
The CDC calls for safer use of antibiotics, both in hospitals and on farms, and increased screening and vaccination efforts. CDC director Tom Frieden put it plainly:

"If we are not careful, we will soon be in a post-antibiotic era."

Unless we do something to reverse this trend, and fast, it’s high time to tuck your head between your knees. We’re either on a plane that’s going down, or we’re about to get paddled. The choice of metaphors is yours.
It’s important that people are educated on the grave nature of this threat, because it is very serious. Make sure your doctors are informed and are prescribing antibiotics correctly, hold your elected officials accountable for safer food and farm policies … and for the budding biologists out there, we’ve got plenty of new problems for you to solve. We’re gonna need your help.
More coverage at Wired.

I wish our government was paying more attention to this instead of the asinine hissy fits going on in DC.

jtotheizzoe:

The CDC has released a first-of-its-kind report detailing the threat of antibiotic-resistant bacteria to our health and food supply. It is not pretty.

Within the report (you can read it here, it’s very layman-accessible) lies threat assessments for a whole range of disease-causing microbes, from famous foes like methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) to lesser-known dangers like Clostridium dificile and drug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae (yes, that last one does exactly what you think it does).

Thousands of people are killed by such infections every year. They inflict billions of dollars of medical costs and lost wages. The drug-development pipeline for new antibiotics is almost empty. New tools like fecal transplants and phage therapy are hopeful but still experimental, and at least a decade away. So what do we do?

The CDC calls for safer use of antibiotics, both in hospitals and on farms, and increased screening and vaccination efforts. CDC director Tom Frieden put it plainly:

"If we are not careful, we will soon be in a post-antibiotic era."

Unless we do something to reverse this trend, and fast, it’s high time to tuck your head between your knees. We’re either on a plane that’s going down, or we’re about to get paddled. The choice of metaphors is yours.

It’s important that people are educated on the grave nature of this threat, because it is very serious. Make sure your doctors are informed and are prescribing antibiotics correctly, hold your elected officials accountable for safer food and farm policies … and for the budding biologists out there, we’ve got plenty of new problems for you to solve. We’re gonna need your help.

More coverage at Wired.

I wish our government was paying more attention to this instead of the asinine hissy fits going on in DC.

(via we-are-star-stuff)

Sep 30
Permalink

neuromorphogenesis:

Think or Feel? Can’t We Do Both?

Thinking and feeling. Logic and emotion. These states of mind are thought to exist at opposite ends of the spectrum, a notion that a Case Western Reserve University scientist says is no accident.

A recent study by Anthony Jack, PhD, assistant professor of cognitive science, philosophy and psychology, found that our abilities to empathize and to analyze branch off the neural tree in two different directions. Put simply, when we fire up the empathetic portion of our brain, we automatically suppress the analytical side, and vice versa.

This dichotomy can have real effects on human health and well-being. Jack compares the phenomenon to a seesaw: If one side doesn’t go down when the other goes up, it could contribute to mental disorders including dementia and schizophrenia.

“Switching from one network to another is important to maintaining a healthy balance,” says Jack.

This challenge also is a matter of simple human interaction. For example, doctors are trained to think of their patients as complex biological machines that need fixing, which may cause their bedside manner to suffer.

“If you think about people as objects, it gets harder to relate to their experience,” Jack says. “It makes you suppress empathetic thinking.”

Jack’s study took functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans of college students presented with questions involving social issues or physics. These tasks caused the seesaw of mental activity to be pushed to different extremes, depending on the type of question.

“We showed that getting inside someone else’s head turned off the part of your brain that thinks about mechanical things,” Jack says.

While we cannot be fully empathetic and analytic at the same time, blended modes of thought borrow from each side, such as creative and Machiavellian thinking. Maintaining a balance also may be key to aging more successfully: Studies suggest that people who switch off the empathetic portions of their brains are more susceptible to dementia.

His findings have garnered attention outside academia. Jack discussed his research with executives from Google and global design company IDEO at the Wisdom 2.0 conference in February.

(Source: case.edu)

Permalink
colchrishadfield:

Some selfies are more thought-provoking than others. Amazing what you can see in the reflection.

colchrishadfield:

Some selfies are more thought-provoking than others. Amazing what you can see in the reflection.

(via we-are-star-stuff)

Sep 24
Permalink
What we observe is not nature itself, but nature exposed to our method of questioning.
— Werner Heisenberg (via we-are-star-stuff)

(Source: quantumaniac, via we-are-star-stuff)

Sep 11
Permalink
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Sleep deprivation depletes the glucose level in your pre-frontal cortex… This has consequences for your decision-making: If you don’t get enough sleep, you leave your self-control engine running on empty. If you do get enough sleep, you restore that fuel base.